How long does it take to make a painting?

How long does it take to make a painting?

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July 2021 Exhibition at F.A.N. Gallery

 

 

 

In July of this year, I finally had my long-postponed solo show. I had worked towards this show for several years and then it had to be rescheduled due to Covid-19. For more than an year, I did not know if I would even have a chance to show this work. 

 

In May, the gallery owner called and asked if I would be ready to show in about six weeks. Luckily, I had nearly 40 paintings framed and ready to go. 

 

It felt wonderful to show the work. Painting can be isolating at times and quarantine only made solitary studio practice seem even more lonely. An exhibition offers an opportunity to connect with people. I can see what people respond to in my work. It is good to see all the work hung together- allowing one to see progress and growth as an artist. I can never see it all together in the studio because there is not enough room to see the work not surrounded by visual clutter.

 

Instead of doing an art opening on 4th of July weekend we did a closing reception on July 31st. Throughout the evening, friends and collectors stopped by to see the work. I saw more people in those few hours than I had seen in more than a year. It was wonderful to meet new people and talk to friends and acquaintances. 

 

Over all, sales were good. About a third of the work went to new collectors. As artists, we are not supposed to want sales or talk about the more commercial aspects of art production. However, art sales mean that I can support my art practice and the income from my artwork allows me more time for creativity.

 

Looking at art work has some of the same mental health benefits as walking in nature. If you experience pleasure from the arts, whether it is the visual arts or performing arts, think about supporting those artist and supporting your own well being by collecting their work. 

 

 

 

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Kate Kern Mundie: Coming Back (An Artist Statement)

Kate Kern Mundie: Coming Back

 

I am an intuitive painter. I approach each painting without a definite plan or an expectation of what I want the end result to look like. Shadows are what draw me to my subjects and define for me what I am to paint. The shadow tells the story and defines the space. I paint the shadows to dominate the composition and build the painting around them. I love bright and luminous color, but I cannot show off how brilliant a color is without the contrasting darkness.

 

 

After having been treated for and recovering from cancer, I have come back to painting at the same time I am also coming back to myself. Cancer had left me physically changed and mentally full of doubt. I questioned why was I an artist? Why did I want to paint? Through painting without expectations I found my confidence and acceptance of who I am now.

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July 2021 Press Release for Kate Kern Mundie: Coming Back

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

DATE: June 15, 2021

 

CONTACTS: Kate Mundie 267-456-1851, mundieart@gmail.com or Fred Al Nakib 215-922-5155

 

LOCATION: F.A.N. Gallery, 221 Arch Street, Philadelphia PA

 

WEBSITE: thefangallery.com

 

 

 

 

Kate Kern Mundie: Coming Back at F.A.N. Gallery, July 2 to 30, 2021

 

During the month of July, F.A.N. Gallery in Philadelphia will present Coming Back, an exhibition of Kate Kern Mundie’s loosely representational impressionistic paintings.

 

Featuring nearly forty new paintings, Coming Back is Kate Kern Mundie’s first exhibition since her cancer diagnosis six years ago. Mundie had built a reputation for unapologetically colorful landscape paintings while in her 30s with shows, awards, and artist residencies. However, following her cancer diagnosis at 40 and the lengthy treatment and recovery, Kate struggled to find her artistic voice again. Chemotherapy left her thinking clouded and affected her ability to see color. Even the physical act of painting could be exhausting.

 

In the last three years, Kate has come back into painting and has once again found a bold and vibrant color palette and the use of dynamic light and shadow. With this most recent body of work, she describes her inspiration: “Shadows are what attracts me and tells me this is the thing to paint. The shadow tells the story in a painting, it defines the space. I paint the shadows to dominate the composition and build the painting around them. I love bright and luminous color but I can’t show off how brilliant a color is without the contrasting darkness.”

 

When coming up with a title for this exhibition, Kate decided to call it Coming Back. Kate said, “I was back to painting again but was also coming back to myself. After cancer, I questioned why was I an artist? Why did I want to paint? Cancer had left me physically changed and mentally full of doubt. Through these paintings, I found my confidence and acceptance of who I am now."

 

Kate Kern Mundie: Coming Back is on view at F.A.N. Gallery, 221 Arch Street, Philadelphia, from July 2 through 30. An artist reception will be held on Friday, July 30, from 5 to 8:00 p.m. For more information, please visit thefangallery.com or call 215-922-5155.

 

 

Image: Kate Kern Mundie, Cypress Street (Wisteria), oil on panel, 14 x 11 inches

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What kind of painter am I?

 

Recently, I was rejected from the American Artist Professional League (AAPL). Their reasoning was that my work was too impressionistic and they only accept realism.

 

I aspire, not only in style but subject, to artists like Hopper and Bellows who are considered American Realist painters. I saw my work as realist in subject and a painting style that walks a line between realism and impressionism but leaned more heavily towards realism. 

 

It is interesting to see how others perceive your work and style. Do I need to rewrite my artist statement?  How to I talk about my work? What kind of painter am I, and does a label even matter? I suppose it only matters, if I am applying for shows or networking where there is a designated theme or desired style. 

 

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